Cassette Tape Coffee Table.

Cassette Tape Coffee Table.

The Cassette Table is hand crafted with hardwood with a specially designed vinyl label that is sealed and protected with a clear epoxy coating. Stainless steel cup holders give the tape dimension. The front shelf, protected by a magnetically clasped wooden tape-run, offers a practical storage space for remotes and magazines while amping up the nostalgic look of the cassette tape. The Cassette Table is 42″ x 26″ x 15″.

30min Series Cassette Tape Coffee Table

(via Thrillist)

(Via [BB-Blog].)

Mixtape-to-iPhone Converter

The BritList: A Mixtape-to-iPhone Converter, Inbox Pause & More | Brit + Co.

MixtapeiPhone 645x621

Cassette to iPod Converter:Β Wait, it looks like a walkman and it converts audio tape cassettes into MP3 files and stores them directly on your iPhone? AMAZING! You knew you were saving all those angsty mixtapes for a reason. ($80)

Tapes

Apple2History.org reminds us of a time before floppy disks when…

Apple2History.org reminds us of a time before floppy disks when the cassette tape was the standard way of writing and retrieving data from an Apple ][.

The earliest Apple II owners did what most of the microcomputer hobbyists of the day did – they used the lowly cassette to save the programs they wrote, or possibly to load software that was purchased. And even after the Disk II did appear in 1978, it was still $495. Although this was less costly than floppy disk drives for other micros of the the day[1], it was still about one third of the cost of the entry level Apple IIΒ ! For many who pioneered the use of the Apple II, it was simply not affordable to get that expensive (though highly desirable) Disk II drive, at least not for a couple of years. From 1977 until around 1982, there were a significant number of software titles that were sold on cassette, because it was the most affordable way to use the computer.

I love that Apple still keeps Apple ][ Cassette interface instructions in its knowledge base.

Apple ][ Star Wars Cassette photo by Grant Hutchinson.

(Via Mac Floppy.)