StickNFind

Bluetooth stickers help you find things when you lose them

StickNFinds are Bluetooth location stickers the diameter of a quarter (but thicker than a quarter). You attach them to television remote controls, pets, children, or other things that you need to locate. The batteries last about a year. The StickNFind smart phone application helps you find your missing items and life forms. It is also advertised as a kind of early warning system: “stick the Stick-N-Find on your wife’s car. Once she pulls in the driveway, you get a notification, clean your mess, and go wash dishes before she comes in.” That is some fast dishwashing.

The company that makes StickNFind is seeking $70,000 on Indiegogo. So far they’ve received close to $40,000 with 42 days left in the campaign.

StickNFind






(Via Boing Boing.)

ALT/1977: WE ARE NOT TIME TRAVELERS

ALT/1977: WE ARE NOT TIME TRAVELERS on the Behance Network

4000lps

What would you do if you could travel back in time? Assassinate Marilyn Monroe? Go on a date with Hitler? Obviously. But here’s what I’d do after that: grab all the modern technology I could find, take it to the late 70’s, superficially redesign it all to blend in, start a consumer electronics company to unleash it upon the world, then sit back as I rake in billions, trillions, or even millions of dollars.

I’ve explored that idea in this series by re-imagining four common products from 2010 as if they were designed in 1977.

(Via http://www.behance.net.)

USS Macon

★ CJWHO

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Construction of the USS Macon Airship

‘USS Macon (ZRS-5) was an airship built and operated by the United States Navy for scouting. She served as a ”flying aircraft carrier”, launching Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk biplane fighters. In service for less than two years, in 1935 Macon was damaged in a storm and lost off California’s Big Sur coast.’

(Via ★ CJWHO.)

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MultiTail

MultiTail

NewImage

What is it in short?

MultiTail follows files in style, it is tail on steroids.

Can you elaborate on that?

MultiTail lets you view one or multiple files like the original tail program. The difference is that it creates multiple windows on your console (with ncurses). It can also monitor wildcards: if another file matching the wildcard has a more recent modification date, it will automatically switch to that file. That way you can, for example, monitor a complete directory of files. Merging of 2 or even more logfiles is possible. It can also use colors while displaying the logfiles (through regular expressions), for faster recognition of what is important and what not. It can also filter lines (again with regular expressions). It has interactive menus for editing given regular expressions and deleting and adding windows. One can also have windows with the output of shell scripts and other software. When viewing the output of external software, MultiTail can mimic the functionality of tools like ‘watch’ and such.

National Cryptological Museum

National Cryptological Museum at the National Security Agency (NSA)

Enigma Machine

Supercomputer

Last fall I visited the National Cryptological Museum located at the National Security Agency (NSA) in Ft. Meade, Maryland. The museum features an amazing collection of items from the history of cryptology and spy technology, including several Enigma machines and two Cray supercomputers. Here are my photos of the museum.

The National Cryptologic Museum is the National Security Agency’s principal gateway to the public. It shares the Nation’s, as well as NSA’s, cryptologic legacy and place in world history. Located adjacent to NSA Headquarters, Ft. George G. Meade, Maryland, the Museum houses a collection of thousands of artifacts that collectively serve to sustain the history of the cryptologic profession. Here visitors can catch a glimpse of some of the most dramatic moments in the history of American cryptology: the people who devoted their lives to cryptology and national defense, the machines and devices they developed, the techniques they used, and the places where they worked.

Photo Gallery: National Cryptological Museum

photos by Scott Beale

(Via Laughing Squid.)

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This is Now

This is Now, Real-Time Streams of Instagram Photos From Select Cities

This is Now

This is Now is a site that compiles city-specific streams of Instagram photos as the photos are posted. The streams serve as a kind of fast-paced visual storyline of what is going on in a given city right now: try New York City, Tokyo, and London. This is Now was created by Lexical Gap in Australia.

via Matthew Ingram & Breanna Hughes

(Via Laughing Squid.)

Tapes

Apple2History.org reminds us of a time before floppy disks when…

Apple2History.org reminds us of a time before floppy disks when the cassette tape was the standard way of writing and retrieving data from an Apple ][.

The earliest Apple II owners did what most of the microcomputer hobbyists of the day did – they used the lowly cassette to save the programs they wrote, or possibly to load software that was purchased. And even after the Disk II did appear in 1978, it was still $495. Although this was less costly than floppy disk drives for other micros of the the day[1], it was still about one third of the cost of the entry level Apple II ! For many who pioneered the use of the Apple II, it was simply not affordable to get that expensive (though highly desirable) Disk II drive, at least not for a couple of years. From 1977 until around 1982, there were a significant number of software titles that were sold on cassette, because it was the most affordable way to use the computer.

I love that Apple still keeps Apple ][ Cassette interface instructions in its knowledge base.

Apple ][ Star Wars Cassette photo by Grant Hutchinson.

(Via Mac Floppy.)